5919 Creedmoor Rd, Raleigh, NC 27612

Open Mon-Fri: 7:30AM to 6PM, Sat: 9AM to 1PM

crahpets@gmail.com

Open Mon-Fri: 7:30AM to 6PM, Sat: 9AM to 1PM, Sun: Closed

Creedmoor Road Animal Hospital
Ophthalmology

Ophthalmology

Just like humans, dogs and cats can develop glaucoma, a condition that results from increased pressure inside the eye. Some breeds are more predisposed than others, and pets over the age of five are also at higher risk of developing secondary glaucoma.

Left untreated, glaucoma can lead to a permanent loss of vision. Catching it early with routine testing is key to successful treatment.

Creedmoor Road Animal Hospital offers advanced tonometry, which measures the pressure inside an animal’s eyes and is central to the diagnosis and management of glaucoma. Using a handheld veterinary tonomoter (called a TonoVet) we can quickly and accurately measure the pressure in your pet’s eyes without anesthetic—or anxiety!

It’s important for you as a pet owner to know if your pet is at higher risk of developing glaucoma, so regular screening can begin at an early age (before 5). Those breeds include:

  • Afghan
  • Akita
  • Alaskan Malamute
  • Basset Hound
  • Beagle
  • Border Collie
  • Boston Terrier
  • Bouvier des Flanders
  • Cairn Terrier
  • Cardigan Welsh Corgi
  • Chihuahua
  • Chow
  • Cocker Spaniel
  • Dachshund
  • Dalmatian
  • Dandie Dinmont Terrier
  • English Springer Spaniel
  • Giant Schnauzer
  • Great Dane

  • Manchester Terrier
  • Miniature Pinscher
  • Norfolk Elk Hound
  • Norwich Terrier
  • Pembroke Welsh Corgi
  • Poodle
  • Saluki
  • Samoyed
  • Scottish Terrier
  • Shih Tzu
  • Siberian Husky
  • Skye Terrier
  • Smooth Coat Fox Terrier
  • Tibetan Terrier
  • Welsh Springer Spaniel
  • Whippet
  • Wire Haired Fox Terrier

The cat breeds most susceptible to developing glaucoma are Burmese, Maine Coon, Maltese and Siamese.

Have questions about glaucoma or want to schedule testing for your pet? Call us at 919-781-0696.

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